In Other News: the ice bucket challenge

A look at a current news item through the lens of different titles available on GVRL.

By Michelle Eickmeyer

A quick poll of my friends yields the following: zero people thought about ALS during the month of June. Better than 90% of them have laughed at someone they know dousing themselves with cold water.

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Partner Interview: Barbara Ferry of the National Geographic Society

What makes working for National Geographic a fulfilling experience and why should you be excited to add National Geographic Virtual Library to your collection? Find out straight from the source. Recently, we had the pleasure of interviewing Barbara Ferry, the Director of the Library & Archives at National Geographic Society. Check out this quick bio to learn more about her professional accomplishments–and, then, it’s on to the interview!

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More Newspapers for NewsVault while MOMW Now Links to Gale Artemis

Gale NewsVault, the definitive cross-searching experience for Gale’s range of historical newspaper and periodical collections, has added British Newspapers IV, 1780-1950, Punch Historical Archive, 1841-1992, and The Independent Digital Archive, 1986-2012. The collections will now appear within the resource.

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Weekend Travel Reads

Large Print Book on a Beach

By Holly Hibner and Mary Kelly

You’re going away for the weekend. You have a few hours to kill on the plane, or maybe in the car, and you love to read. You don’t want to think too much, though – after all, you’re on vacation!  You need a book you can devour in a weekend. What’s it going to be? Here are some suggestions for quick, light reads perfect for vacation.

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Schaffer and Annie Barrows (2008)
History buffs will find this short work of fiction (274 pages) a perfect vacation read. German-occupied Guernsey Island during World War II is the setting, and the characters are a lovable, eccentric group who form a literary club. A writer named Juliet is intrigued by their society, and joins them on Guernsey Island. Her letters detail her experiences with people who become true friends, and their struggles during the occupation of their home during the war.

Big Girl Panties by Stephanie Evanovich (2014)
There’s something for everyone on this list! Fans of chick lit, gossipy style, and a little (ok, a lot…) of sexy romance will enjoy this quick read. Holly Brennan, a young widow, hooks up with a trainer to get her into shape. Of course, there is undeniable chemistry between them! This one is not recommended for a family car ride audio book! Load up your e-reader and bring a fan, because this one is hot, hot, hot! Perfect for the beach!

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We’re Putting Gale Artemis: Primary Sources Front and Center

The next time you’re browsing your favorite essential primary source collection from Gale, be on the lookout for something new–and pretty exciting, if we do say so ourselves.

On the far right of the menu bar, you’ll now see an orange item that reads “Artemis Primary Sources.” Click on it to expand for an explanation of our new Gale Artemis cross-search experience and to try your search using the new interface. 

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The History of Transcontinental Travel: The Unknown Horizon

American Progress, by John Gast, 1872. Chromolithograph published by George A. Crofutt. Source: Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress.

By Ryan Price

John Gast was a painter based in Brooklyn when he was commissioned to paint this picture for George Crofutt, a publisher of a popular series of western travel guides. The images Gast put to canvas represent a historical timeline of transportation technologies up until 1872 when the painting was completed. The Indian travois, the covered wagons, Pony Express, overland stage and the three railroad lines are not only progressively pushing one another forward (from East to West) but also driving the indigenous inhabitants — buffalo, bear and Native Americans — almost literally off of the painting. In the wake of this expansion are the tall ships in the Atlantic. Meanwhile, Columbia (a personification of the United States) guides the way, holding a schoolbook in one hand while stringing telegraph wire with the other. The imagery is a vivid and dynamic telling of not only the history of westward expansion but the future of it as well.

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