International Dominoes: Chatham House Online Archive

By Robert Lisiecki

Tackling international affairs is no small task; so, when someone can successfully improve international affairs through a determined effort, the success is appropriately recognized.

Members of The Royal Institute of International Affairs, Chatham House, recently voted Melinda Gates as the Chatham House Prize winner. The members annually award the Prize to the individual they deem to have made the most significant contribution to the improvement of international relations in the previous year.

Some previous winners of the award include: Secretary Hillary Clinton, Burmese democracy campaigner Aung San Suu Kyi, and President Lula of Brazil.

Melinda Gates was selected in recognition of her philanthropic commitment and humanitarian efforts and her tireless work to improve the health of women and children through increased access to family planning, simple newborn interventions, lifesaving vaccines, and better nutrition.

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In Other News: MH17

A look at a current news item through the lens of different titles available on GVRL.

By Michelle Eickmeyer

This story is heart-breaking. Everything about the events in Ukraine since 17 July have not made logical or reasonable sense. A commercial airliner with 298 passengers flew, at an approved height, over a battle zone. Fighters in that area blew it out of the sky, believing only a military plane would fly there, with weapons provided by another nation. Then, for days, the same fighters laid a sordid claim to the wreckage, holding the victims and their family in some cruel, unthinkable, inhumane limbo — they held the bodies of victims; they rummaged through their belongings; they took photos. Finger pointing began immediately, and few solid answers have found their way to the surface. The black boxes have finally been turned over and international authorities have begun an increasingly difficult task of proving what happened. Based solely on facts and without pressure from any side.

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In Other News: Hyperthermia

A look at a current news item through the lens of different titles available on GVRL.

By Michelle Eickmeyer

That’s the technical term — hyperthermia. To most of us, it’s the gut-wrenching and heart-breaking situation of a child dying in a hot car. Each summer, the saddest of stories plays out in the news. For one reason or another, a child is alone in a car and he or she dies. There are variants to the story, and, sadly, sometimes lingering suspicions of guilt. In 2013, 44 children died from exposure inside a vehicle in the United States. There have been nearly 20 already this year. (Source)

Here are five titles that look at hyperthermia from different perspectives:

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In Other News: The King of Spain

A look at a current news item through the lens of different titles available on GVRL.

By Michelle Eickmeyer

There are few “jobs” in the world from which people don’t quit. In just over a year, we have seen two exceptions to this — the resignation of Pope Benedict and the abdication of Spain’s King Juan Carlos I. The latter giving just over the (Western) traditional “two weeks notice.” After making his intentions known on the 2nd of June, Spain crowned their new King, Felipe, on the 19th.

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Exciting Times Ahead in Las Vegas for ALA Annual 2014!

By Michael Arthur

In just a few short days, I will be making a much anticipated trip to Las Vegas for ALA Annual 2014.  This will be my first visit to Las Vegas, and I’ve  packed as much into the three-day visit as I possibly could.  But this article isn’t meant to be about my plans as a tourist. Instead, I’d like to share the discussion topics and initiatives that will occupy the bulk of my time while in Vegas.  It will definitely be a busy three days filled to the brim with meetings and events, but I’ll make sure to leave a little time to walk around and see some of Vegas while I am there!

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In Other News: The Congressional Medal of Honor

A look at a current news item through the lens of different titles available on GVRL.

By Michelle Eickmeyer

On June 19, 2013, Corporal William Carpenter became the 15th recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor for service in Iraq or Afghanistan.  It is the highest honor the United States government can bestow on a member of the armed forces.

Winston Churchill once said “never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few,” and the Congressional Medal of Honor is just one small, yet significant, way to honor those who have given much.

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Viva Free Access to Las Vegas Travel Guides

ALA Annual 2014 in Las Vegas

The ALA program (as always) is jam-packed with famous keynote authors and actors, hundreds of sessions addressing all the hot topics facing the library world today, and a hall full of exhibitors who are pulling out all the stops to bring the glitz and glory of Vegas to the tradeshow floor. It’s almost too much excitement for one attendee to bear.

And yet, outside the walls of the Las Vegas Convention Center and various hotel meeting rooms, there is an entire city bustling with activity 24/7. Since you’ll be short on free time (and maybe energy), you’ll want to make sure you’re making the most of every minute.

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Upgraded User-Focused Interface for Literature Criticism Online

Literature Criticism Online library resource

“The interface is as attractive as its capabilities are impressive.” Charleston Advisor

We listened to your students and researchers and have launched a new and updated interface with added functionality for  Literature Criticism Online (LCO).

Since this new interface first launched as an optional upgrade last summer, many libraries have enjoyed the benefits of the new platform. Based on the overwhelmingly positive feedback from customers and users, as of July 7, all libraries who have purchased LCO will be upgraded to the new experience.

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