Moving Bolding into the Future in a Time of Change

Multnomah County Library

By Vailey Oehlke

Each of us knows innately how the world around us is changing. From the smartphone in our pocket or purse that connects us with people and information in an instant, to the ongoing threats posed by large scale corporate data breaches, our lives are very different than they were a few short years ago. There isn’t much we can predict with certainty except that more uncertainty is ahead.

And, of course, the public library exists in this same uncertainty. Some see this as a fundamental threat to libraries. I see it as a transformative opportunity to redefine our role of value, contribute to our communities and change lives in a totally unique way. Aren’t we fortunate to be in positions to effect this opportunity?

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The Best Library

By Natorya N. 

I had lived in Palm Beach County several years before my little brother came to live with me full-time. I’d been to the Downtown West Palm Beach Library hundreds of times and never stopped on the 3rd floor until I knew my little brother was coming down there to live with me. I went to the 3rd floor in search of material on how to raise a good kid. One of the staff, who actually doesn’t work there anymore, helped me by suggesting parenting materials that did help me so much. I began to consider that library to be like a 2nd home to me and my brother. When I needed a break, we’d walk there. We only lived a 15min walk away. He could play around on the computers, read, play games, be around different types of kids, ect… And I could relax, take a break… breathe. Fast forward a couple years. I’d been having these kid stories on my mind for a while. One day, I asked one of our favorite librarians to pull up all the books on a certain subject. She did and I read it. There was only one. Some months later, I started actually writing the stories. Those stories turned into a kids book series and my first book has a release date of 10/28/14. Without the help of this library and these librarians… My life would’ve been much more stressful and I may not be a published author with a new kids book able to be pre-ordered right now (www.ejandsis.tateauthor.com) and in stores soon to be purchased by real people. My brother and I LOVE this library and its’ staff. It’s in the heart of Downtown West Palm Beach, exactly where it should be!

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Planet of the Apes Made Me a Librarian

By Terry M. 

As a young man, a boy really, I LOVED the original Planet of the Apes movie.One Saturday afternoon, I was watching it for the umpteenth time and for some reason this time, I did not want it to end. It was that day, that maleficent fall almost snowy day I became a credit reader. While reading the closing credits, I made a discovery – I discovered that the film was based on a book, by Pierre Boulle. I immediately jumped up and ran throughout the house in search of my father. I found him in the kitchen. The next room over from which I had originally started my paternal hunt. With an outrageous sense of urgency I yelled, “Dad we have to go to the mall.” He withdrew his head from the refrigerator and while slowly turning to face me he closed the fridge door. Once we were face to face he casually tossed the bag o’ turkey he had retrieved on the kitchen table and said, “Why?”

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Who was Donald Lines Jacobus, and why should you care?

Genealogy Connect

By Joe Garonzik

The Connecticut genealogist, Donald Lines Jacobus (pronounced ja cob’ us), was the founder of the modern school of scientific genealogy and the greatest American genealogist of the 20th century. Jacobus and his protégés taught us how to research and write family histories, how to solve genealogical problems, what sources should be used, how to interpret them, and why we must abandon unsupported findings which, in many instances, were built upon flights of imagination as much as on facts.

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Helping students find the right college…and the right path to get there

By Kim Martin
Chance is a hard-working (if sometimes distracted) high school junior.  Besides doing homework and working out with the team, he thinks a lot about College Prep Students unprepairedapplying to college – where to apply, what programs to look at, how to evaluate programs, and how to prepare for the upcoming college entrance exams.  The amount of information and entry points to finding information can be boggling and overwhelming.

Chance and other students in your community are looking for information that can help them evaluate career options, examine courses of study, and find financial aid.  You can provide them with easy-to-use electronic resources that give them instant access to rich information about every aspect of applying to college.

Support your community’s future college graduates now with resources that can help guide important, life-altering decisions and provide them and their families

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Washington D.C. Land of Genealogy

Library of Congress

By Joe Garonzik

Answer the following questions either True or False:

  1. No genealogical research is ever complete unless it has been authenticated by original source records.
  2. Salt Lake City is not the site of the greatest collection of accessible genealogical records in the U.S.
  3. The National Archives in Washington, D.C. is only one of many genealogy record repositories to be found in the nation’s capital.

If you answered false to any of these statements, you should read on. Why? In the first instance, it is an axiom of genealogy that all family research must ultimately be validated against original sources (or facsimiles of those sources on microfilm, etc.). How else can a researcher ever know that his data wasn’t derived from a mis-copied record, or that a lineage published in a book is simply incorrect?

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