In Other News: 43 Abducted Ayotzinapa Students

A look at a current news item through the lens of different titles available on GVRL.

By Michelle Eickmeyer

You have no idea what I’m talking about, do you? Heartbreakingly, this is no surprise. Here is a basic run-down of facts, as they are known, in in the U.S., today: on 26 September, 46 students from the Ayotzinapa Teachers’ College traveled to the city of Iguala. Three students (and an additional three others) were killed by the police. The other 43 students have not been seen since.

Reports indicate that the city’s mayor had the police “intercept” the students, as he had reason to believe they were planning to protest a speech his wife was delivering that day. At some point, police started firing on the students, killing (at least) 3 and 3 others. “Local police allegedly turned over the 43 missing students to members of the criminal gang Guerreros Unidos,” according to the AP. This finding publicly supported by Mexico’s Attorney General this week, citing his office’s own investigation.

In the weeks since, nine mass graves containing 30 victims was found outside of Iquala. As a relief to families, these appear the result of (an)other crime(s). (Horrible news for other families, conversely.)

Leaders of the gang have reported at the mayor’s wife is one of it’s major funding sources, giving the organization 2-3 million pesos “every few weeks.” (Source)

The mayor, his wife, and the chief of police are all on the run. The governor of the Mexican State of Guerrero has stepped aside to allow for a full investigation of the mayor’s role (as well as any role he may have played in covering that up as they are, apparently, friendly members of the same political party). More than 50,000 people marched through Mexico City on Wednesday, calling on the President to intercede. Other protesters took to the streets of Iguala, burning part of the city hall. The leader of Guerreros Unidos has been apprehended and is cooperating with authorities, but has yet to provide insight into what happened once his group had control of the students.

Here are five titles that look at student abduction in Mexico from different perspectives:

Videohound’s Golden Movie Retriever 2015 Edition. Gale, 2015.

From the Godfather to Argo, Ransom to Taken, the story of those who make enemies of politicians or, the unfortunate circumstance of being in the absolute worst place and the worst time is one often told on the silver screen. And what of reporting international crime? Explore what the silver screen has to offer on these serious issues.

Anarchism, Revolution, and Terrorism, 1st Edition. Britannica Education Publishing, 2014.

Look to this new title for information on the value, importance, and impact of “David v Goliath” in the modern political landscape. Uncover truths on both sides, regardless of your stance on “right.”

Global Events: Milestone Events Throughout History, 1st Edition. Gale, 2014

The fight against major drug cartels is long fought. Explore the history of this on-going battle in this title, with a section dedicated to President Felipe Calderon’s launch of the Mexican Drug War with is inauguration in 2006.

Violence in Anthony Burgess’s A Clockwork Orange, 1st Edition. Greenhaven Press, 2014.

English composition instructors looking to tie gang violence into their study of A Clockwork Orange will find this title, well, perfect. Part of the Social Issues in Literature series, this title explores important aspects of childhood decision-making, including the allure of a gang family as well as viable, positive alternatives to the gang lifestyle.

Kidnapping, 2nd Edition. Elsevier Science, 2014.

Explore trends, tactics and trials of 100 randomly selected U.S. kidnapping and abduction cases. Including trial records, relevant case law, readers of this title can explore the legal story of this multifaceted crime.


photoAbout the Author

Michelle is an “anytime!” traveler and language enthusiast. She has degrees in talking from Central Michigan and Michigan State University. She is currently becoming a runner and used to play golf in high school.



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