Advocating for study of the humanities

The STEM field, (science, technology, engineering, and math) has been promoted as the way to go for students seeking careers that are growing and in-demand. The value of humanities is often lost in that conversation. But in a recent trip to Seoul, South Korea,  William D. Adams, chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities … Read more

LGBT History Looking Forward

This October we have been honoring and celebrating LGBT History Month by taking a deeper look into the Archives of Sexuality & Gender and learning more about fascinating and often under represented LGBT historical milestones and icons. In our post “LGBT in America — The Journey Thus Far,” we highlighted some of the most important … Read more

How Digital Technology is Changing 21st Century Student Research

The college years are a transformative time marked by hours spent studying, researching, and collaborating with peers. Studies evaluating the research habits of academics reveal how students are researching and the impact technology has in satisfying the growing demand for high-quality digital content accessible anytime, anywhere, and from any device. In fact, 86% of students … Read more

Librarian on a Mission Increases Access and Awareness of Library Digital Resources

Mark Gottschalk is a librarian on a  mission. His mission is to increase the value that the library provides to the South Plains College campus, located in Levelland, Texas. “My personal mission is to find ways to make the library a more used and integrated part of the college community,” Gottschalk said. By increasing usage … Read more

Keeping the “Human” in Digital Humanities

Cory Rasmussen, graduate student at Chapman University, had the opportunity to read historic, handwritten letters of U.S. soldiers as part of a class assignment, and digitize them.  The letters, housed in Chapman University’s Leatherby Libraries, give a window into the lives of soldiers, going as far back as the Revolutionary War, until the present day … Read more

Digitizing Early Arabic Printed Books: A Workshop

In partnership with Brown University Middle East Studies, Gale is excited to present Digitizing Early Arabic Books: A Workshop.  The event will feature presentations and talks with scholars of Middle East and Arabic Studies. Gale will also present a demonstration of  Early Arabic Printed Books from the British Library  , the new DH Sandbox, and text … Read more

Celebrate the Freedom to Read

By Traci Cothran

Reading is central to everything we do here at Gale—and whatbbw you do at your library every day—so it’s a good bet the majority of us use Banned Books Week to rally around the works that cause a little controversy.  This year’s Banned Books Week focuses on celebrating Diversity, and runs September 25 – October 1.

I’m an avid reader of middle grade and young adult fiction, so it drives me a little batty when parents ban amazing novels that speak to youth. Some authors are even dis-invited from appearing at schools to talk about their books and the issues affecting kids today.  For instance, the graphic novel Drama, by Raina Telgemeier, has caused grumblings for two gay characters kissing, but I’ve yet to meet a middle school girl who doesn’t love this series.  Author Meg Medina faced scrutiny with her novel about high school bullying, Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass, because the title has a swear word in it—and you know such language is never spoken in school hallways!  Kate Messner was dis-invited from a school speaking engagement while on tour for her book, The Seventh Wish, because the main character’s sister struggles with a heroin addiction, affecting the whole family.  But there’s no reason to talk about the real-life heroin epidemic affecting kids in high schools and middle schools across the U.S., is there?

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Keeping the Conversation Going

Malala Yousafzai, Svetlana Alexievich and Shakespeare

I think of literary criticism as a conversation: an author speaks to an audience, which responds with comments, questions, sometimes praise, and sometimes disparagement. The discussion can last for centuries. In the case of Shakespeare, for instance, in 1592, early in his career, he was dismissed by fellow writer Robert Greene as an “upstart crow beautified with our feathers” and mocked as a “Shake-scene” (whatever that is).

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American Governance Benefits Beginning Students and the Civic-Minded Reader

“…the coverage and treatment of American Governance appears to be among the most extensive to date, and the concepts presented will not grow quickly outdated.”  – CHOICE

Searching for a “highly factual and researched” resource for beginning students? American Governance  provides a clear and authoritative depictions of ideas that are core to the U.S. system of governance. Presented alphabetically, the 700 original, peer-reviewed entries written by content specialists also includes approximately 300 images and primary source documents. American Governance assists learners in developing  America’s  system of governance understanding.

This review is published in the August 2016 issue of CHOICE

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Relevance Default Sort Enabled In InfoTrac Products

Good News! In an effort to further improve the user experience by delivering the most relevant articles among the first search results returned, we have enabled the default sort to Relevance for all InfoTrac products. Results will be ordered by relevance, and because currency is an important element of periodical content, the determination of relevance will contain a significant boost for recency. Users still have the ability to toggle and view by newest/oldest date if they choose during their research session.

Additionally, Gale has retired the “My Account” feature in InfoTrac products including PowerSearch, in favor of Google and Microsoft 365 collaboration tools our users are already employing. This change will provide one simple, seamless login experience, further enabling users to access Gale content anytime, anywhere, and from any device.

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