A Big Thumbs Up for Biology, 2nd Edition

Biology, 2nd Edition includes 439 A-Z entries covering biological concepts, the history of science, and critical issues such as embryogenesis and the commercial applications of research, ethical issues, and careers in biology. More than 60 entries are brand new and almost three times as many entries are substantially revised and updated; all entries have been reviewed for currency.

The writing level makes accurate information accessible to a high school audience. Full-color photographs, diagrams, and sidebars add visual interest. More than 600 terms are defined in the margins of the pages where they appear and compiled into a convenient glossary at the back of each volume. Each entry contains a bibliography/suggestions for further reading. A thematic outline provides a guide to entries by subject. Handy references in the front matter include a geologic time scale and metric conversion table.

See what an Associate Dean of Libraries at Prevo Science Library thinks about the newest edition:

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The Reviews are in, Gale Interactive: Science is a Recommended Resource

Zoom in. Out. Rotate 360 degrees. Imagine what it’s like to face complex science concepts with more knowledge and less fear. Gale Interactive: Science does that by giving middle and high schoolers the power to see science beyond static text through 3D models in over 150 interactive sessions and 60 models to print with a 3D printer. Students and instructors can manipulate and explore 3D models that are paired with reference and periodical content for further understanding. Learners are inspired to achieve the ultimate outcome: discovery.

Gain more knowledge by reading a few quick reviews.

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Tending the Academic Garden with CLiC

Posted on February 9, 2016

By Megan McCarthy

I love to garden, and over the years I’ve gotten pretty good at it. However, that wasn’t always the case. When I first started, every spring I’d run to Lowes, and pick out all the blooming plants I thought looked pretty. I’d bring them home, and plant them in my yard. Then, every year, I would watch in horror as they would wither and die. What was I doing wrong?  Well, as it turned out, almost everything. I finally consulted with a gardening expert, and found that plants had to be grown according to their needs. Some needed shade, some sun. Some needed dry soil, and others needed water. Most liked to be planted when they weren’t in bloom, probably the reason I was killing so many. I learned some important lessons, but the most valuable lesson I learned was, when you are in trouble, ask an expert.

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