Baby, You Can Drive my Car

Posted on April 18, 2016

By Mary Kelly

One of my favorite databases to play with is Gale’s Chilton collection. Not because I am a car person. (To me a car is a giant purse on wheels.) Not because as a librarian it is the easiest way to do car repair reference (which is very true). The Chilton database is more like my own personal marriage saver. This is because I have been married to an auto engineer for more than thirty years and car vocabulary is constantly the lingua franca of our household. This arrangement is great since I really don’t have to worry about car stuff. However, I do have to listen to all sorts of talk about cars. I am also told (in great detail) about car maintenance issues and why it is important.

Chilton is my personal car vocabulary resource/translator for about 75% of our conversations. (Yeah, this database is bookmarked for me.) It helps me explain my car problems to the Engineer husband, followed by criticisms of my general lack of car knowledge and failure to follow regular maintenance schedules.  This discussion is usually punctuated by people shouting and swearing. (Note: The current version does not include any definitions for the accompanying swearing associated with car repairs. Perhaps Chilton’s can consider adding swear words as a “feature” in future releases, until that happens, you are on your own.)

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How to Repair Your Ornithopter

Posted on January 4, 2016

By Ryan Lee Price

 In an era when character development and plot structure took a backseat to technological ideas and dystopian/utopian predictions, Frank Herbert deliberately suppressed technology in the Dune World saga so he could focus on the future of humanity rather than what technology humanity could create. What resulted was a series of books that earned widespread acclaim, Nebula and Hugo awards, and what some consider the greatest and most profitable science fiction novel ever written.

But it almost wasn’t so.

Herbert had been a moderately successful science fiction short story writer, having his work appear in several magazines, starting with “Looking for Something” in the April 1952 issue of Startling Stories. He followed that with several stories in a variety of magazines and a novel, Under Pressure, serialized in Astounding magazine (which changed its name to Analog in 1960), all the while working as a reporter for various northeast regional newspapers.

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Announcing Audio Component in ChiltonLibrary

Chilton Auto Repair Library Resource

Posted on June 10, 2015

ReadSpeaker text-to-speech technology is now available in the Repair and Bulletin/Recalls sections of ChiltonLibrary. ReadSpeaker® is the worldwide leader in online text to speech and its functionality lets users hear the article read out loud, as the words spoken are highlighted on the screen.

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Basic Vehicle Awareness – 3 Quick Checks From Chilton

By Gene Hannon Jr.
We count on our vehicles to get us where we want to go safely. Most vehicles are reliable, but extreme weather and busy schedules can mean trouble for your vehicle. Basic vehicle awareness consists of simple little things we can do that might just help us avoid a bad situation. Here are 3 quick checks you can make to help protect yourself, your passengers and others on the road.

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The History of Transcontinental Travel Part 2: Wheels and Wings

Chilton DIY

By Ryan Price

In October of 1893, General Roy Stone, a Civil War hero and roads advocate, was appointed to be in charge of the new Office of Road Inquiry (ORI) within the Department of Agriculture. With a budget of $10,000, ORI promoted new rural road development to serve the wagons, coaches, and bicycles on America’s dirt roads.

With the emergence of cheaper automobiles and its increasing availability, most of society gravitated to this new form of transportation, but suitable roads beyond wagon trails were slow in coming.

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It’s All about Horsepower for Gearhead Patrons

Chilton Auto Resources at Library

By Ryan Lee Price

The 305 cubic-inch engine in the Koenigsegg One “megacar” is capable of producing 1,360 horsepower from its gas-powered V8, propelling the 1,360-kg car to a top speed of 280 mph in 20 seconds. That’s a lot of power, and one can’t help but to imagine 1,360 horses hitched to the front of the $1.5 million car attempting to pull it up to 280 mph. However, in either guise—engine or horse team—1,360 horsepower represents the work of a lot of horses, and to understand how the term has been applied to cars, we have to go back about 100 years before cars were even invented.

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Why You Should Consider the Timing Belt When Buying a High-Mileage Vehicle

Chilton Library Summer Travel

By Christine Sheeky

If you have been shopping for a used car with high mileage, over 60,000 miles or so, there is a very important, often overlooked item to take into consideration. Maybe you have found a suitable car in your price range. One of the next steps to take is to research whether that vehicle has a timing chain or timing belt, because a timing belt repair is a significant expense.
What is a Timing Belt?

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