HOW RESEARCH PARTNERS DEMONSTRATE THE IMPORTANCE OF TODAY’S LIBRARY

Published on March 11, 2016   To illustrate how Gale, a part of Cengage Learning, bridges the librarian-faculty gap, we worked with Thomson Reuters on a State of Innovation article to show how librarians can facilitate academic collaboration. In the article Sarah Tanksalvala, a copywriter at Thomson Reuters, shares Thomson Reuters’s ideas as well as … Read more

Product Updates for Primary Source Newspapers

line of folded newspapers

The annual update for several primary source newspaper archives are now available: The Economist Historical Archive, 1843-2012 The Times Digital Archive, 1785-2010 The Times Literary Supplement Historical Archive, 1902-2011 Adding tens of thousands of new pages, new, more contemporary results will begin to show immediately in your searches. The additional materials are now available within each archive, … Read more

Tales for the ‘Every-day Reader’: Winston Churchill and the ‘War in the Indian Highlands’

Posted on December 14, 2015

By: Daniel Pullin, Publishing Assistant, Gale, a part of Cengage Learning

When the name ‘Winston Churchill’ is mentioned, images of a heroic war leader with cigar in mouth and face set in steely determination are usually the first to come to mind. His wartime speeches became iconic in symbolising gung-ho British determination to battle on through endless bloodshed, helping steer Britain through the turmoil of a cataclysmic conflict. Yet, with perhaps less well-known flair, the former Prime Minister proved equally adept on paper.  This is evident in his first published material: a series of war letters commissioned for British newspaper The Daily Telegraph.

Between October and December 1897, Churchill wrote and published the eleven letters while accompanying the Malakand Field Force in India. With Gale’s The Telegraph Historical Archive, 1855-2000 now available, these letters are fully-searchable in digital format for the first time. This gave me the perfect opportunity to explore their contents.

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Gale Furthers Digital Preservation with Portico

We at Gale have just furthered our digital preservation partnership with Portico, the leading service in the field. To help explain how this free service will help you get even more out of your favorite Gale resources, we’ve prepared the following FAQ. Please don’t hesitate to reach out with any additional questions. Happy preserving!

Q: What is Portico and what services do they provide?

A: Portico (www.portico.org) is a trusted, not-for-profit digital preservation service and is among the largest community-supported digital archives in the world.  Working with libraries and publishers, Portico preserves e-journals, e-books, and other digital scholarly content to ensure researchers and students will have access to these resources in the future.  Portico is a service of ITHAKA (www.ithaka.org), a not-for-profit organisation dedicated to helping the academic community use digital technologies to preserve the scholarly record and to advance research and teaching in sustainable ways.   

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Behind the Screen: At the Dibner Library

By Jennifer Albers-Smith

I’ve been to the Smithsonian a couple times before, and I’ve always thought of it as just a museum (and a glorious one at that) – giant covered wagon, old-fashioned cars, sewing machines, etc. I had absolutely no idea what lay behind the exhibits until my recent trip to do some filming for our latest Behind the Screen video at the National Museum of American History.

We lugged our film equipment through the side entrance and took a long walk through a dimly-lit maze to get to a wooden door – the entrance to the Dibner Library. I had never noticed the sign for the Dibner Library before. It’s right off the main entrance to the museum, and open to the public, but it’s tucked away, and most visitors have no idea it exists… What’s inside is an absolute treasure trove.

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The Changing Student Demographic

By Jennifer Albers-Smith

Student demographics are changing–foreign, traditional, non-traditional, online. The way people access learning and research is changing. The Parthenon Group surveyed 3,200 students. Only 24% of those students were considered traditional. There is no doubt that the world has changed drastically in the last decade. Here at Gale, we know that your library plays a critical role in preparing your students, making them more successful in their courses, and helping them meet faculty expectations.

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