The Job-Market Moment of Digital Humanities

By Leonard Cassuto Digital humanities have become integrated into the academic job market. In fact, digital humanities are one of the few growth areas in the academic job market today say’s Leonard Cassuto of “The Chronicle of Higher Education. That raised the question: Will expertise in digital humanities get graduate students the academic jobs that … Read more

Add Tech to a Humanities Degree to Bridge the Employment Gap

Story by: Nikki Wiart November 2, 2016 Check out this very interesting article by Maclean’s.  This article tells the story of how students now are being encouraged to have diverse skills sets, balancing the technical and the liberal arts type classes, to help prepare them for employment opportunities and the employment challenges facing today’s job … Read more

The Big Jump From High School To College

By Traci Cothran

Diamond is a recent high school graduate from a charter school in Detroit, heading off to college this fall. We’ve been together for four years in the Big Brothers Big Sisters Detroit program, and I recently demonstrated our Gale databases for her, and asked her a few questions to share here on our blog.

You’re a college freshman – congratulations!  What are you excited – and maybe anxious – about?

I’m excited to get away from home and be independent.  I’m nervous about the work load in comparison to high school – everyone says it’s much harder – but I’m confident I have the organizational skills for success.  However, my college has great tutoring resources that I know I can use – and they’re located right in my dorm.  I’m not planning on working or doing sports my first year to be sure I have a handle on academics.  But I am going to check out the various clubs and organizations and plan to join some.

Did you visit a library at your college during the tour? 

Yes, we toured the library.  The library not only had a floor with books, but I was surprised to find it had a study floor, and quiet floors, too.  There’s a tablet instead of a librarian to use to find resources and direct you to them.  I don’t recall online resources mentioned during the tour.

How much did you use print books and electronic resources during high school?

Once I switched schools after ninth grade, it was 100% digital and worksheets – no print textbooks.  We were a “Google school,” and we were provided with Google computers, with Google software and integration.  I’m comfortable with either digital or print, though sometimes I prefer print.  My teachers used all kinds of online resources, but we did not have a physical library or librarian.

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Give Your Job Search a Boost Using GVRL

Posted on March 24, 2016

Originally posted in November 2015 by Henrietta Verma of Library Journal

Job seekers are some of your library’s most frequent users. They all seek the same goal—satisfying employment, quickly—but they have varying skills, educational levels, and different needs. One may need a part time job while his children are at school, for example, while another may be seeking leads on a high-level corporate position. Still others will be looking for internships and volunteer work that will enhance their résumé while they seek paying work. Among the thousands of books available on GVRL are many for those seeking a new job or a career change. See below for links to just a few of the relevant titles.

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Job Hunting Isn’t What it Used to Be

Note to librarians: This blog post is for you to share! If you have this title, be sure to link it to your GVRL collection. If you don’t have this title and want to learn more, access a free trial today!  

 

Resumes without special formatting… online applications… no phone calls… social media networking… computer-based screening…

If you’ve ever tried to explain the current processes for applying for a job to a grandparent (or maybe even a parent), you have a sense of how much it has changed in the last 20 years. And it continues to change. Today’s impersonal process can be confusing and off-putting to even the most determined job seekers.

Find information about careers, job hunting, and more
To support people in our community who are looking for new opportunities – whether for a job change or a new career – the library provides free access to a great resource: Life & Career Skills: Employment.

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TEL & Career Transitions: Connecting People with Jobs

By Steven Hicks and Kim Martin

For job seekers, libraries play a crucial role in career discovery, development, and overall assistance. In fact, almost one quarter of library visitors are there to look or apply for a job, according to the Pew Research Center. 1. To further solidify the library’s role as a hub for employment resources, in July, 2014 President Obama signed into law the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, identifying public libraries as potential partners of the American Job Center network, and acknowledging libraries’ ability to provide an expansive array of job search services.

Career Transitions, an online resource from Gale, assists users with career exploration and offers a complete, personalized and guided experience from assessing strengths and interests, to finding new career opportunities, to ultimately completing professional resumes and improving the chances of landing jobs.

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Life Coach, Anyone? Self-Guided, Online Support for Better Living

By Tina Creguer 

Achieving personal and professional excellence doesn’t “just happen” for most people. Success typically results from persistence and guidance. For some, turning to a life coach is useful – receiving personal assistance with decision-making and skills acquisition. But with rates averaging $100 to $300 per hour, that service is out of reach for most young adults.

But hiring a professional isn’t the only path. With new resources from Gale, those eager for coaching can find help at the library. (In fact, at YOUR library!)

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