Vampires, Skeletons, and Monsters

As Halloween approaches, readers with an interest in the eerie and macabre side of literary history can find plenty to keep them up at night in Literature Criticism Series. Volume 200 of Short Story Criticism, for example, is a triple-feature of horror, with entries on Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu’s novella Carmilla, William Faulkner’s “A Rose … Read more…

Keeping the Conversation Going

Malala Yousafzai, Svetlana Alexievich and Shakespeare

I think of literary criticism as a conversation: an author speaks to an audience, which responds with comments, questions, sometimes praise, and sometimes disparagement. The discussion can last for centuries. In the case of Shakespeare, for instance, in 1592, early in his career, he was dismissed by fellow writer Robert Greene as an “upstart crow beautified with our feathers” and mocked as a “Shake-scene” (whatever that is).

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The Ever-changing State of Literary Criticism

Posted on February 18, 2016

By Larry Trudeau

I was recently reviewing an entry on Charles Dickens’s Great Expectations for an upcoming volume of Nineteenth Century Literary Criticism (NCLC), and was surprised—delighted, really—to see that we were including two reviews of the novel from 1861, the year it was published in book form.

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Upgraded User-Focused Interface for Literature Criticism Online

Literature Criticism Online library resource

“The interface is as attractive as its capabilities are impressive.” Charleston Advisor

We listened to your students and researchers and have launched a new and updated interface with added functionality for  Literature Criticism Online (LCO).

Since this new interface first launched as an optional upgrade last summer, many libraries have enjoyed the benefits of the new platform. Based on the overwhelmingly positive feedback from customers and users, as of July 7, all libraries who have purchased LCO will be upgraded to the new experience.

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