Alternative Facts, Fake News, and Digital Literacy

By Traci Cothran

There was a time when we didn’t need to define what a fact was – or rather, we all understood that it meant the same thing. It was a fact – it was the truth; the rest was fiction or opinion. There were clear, credible sources, and there were those that weren’t. Now students, teachers, and librarians (as well as the rest of the American populous) must grapple with distinguishing fact, fake news, and “alternative facts” on a near-constant basis. While the Internet gives us a plethora of easy-to-access information, it’s up to us to discern what is factual and what is not.

To do that, we need to start asking hard questions of everything we read and hear – such as:

  • Where did that Facebook “news” post originate?
  • Is this news or a “newsvertisement?”
  • Are these statistics or this sound bite taken out of context to distort their meaning?
  • Who penned this article? Do they have a specific agenda that influences their writing?
  • Who created this website and how are they getting paid for their content?
  • When you reverse-search the image used in the article, do you find different source content?

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The Evolution of the Newspaper Industry

By Kevin Kohls While the newspaper industry is trying to adapt to a future where the physical newspaper is a thing of the past, Gale and The British Library are bringing the digital revolution to the 18th century. In an effort to preserve and expand access to the history of the newspaper industry, The British … Read more…

Binge-worthy Primary Sources You’ll Love

The public library is a place for creativity and innovation, a place for civil discourse and debate, a place for dialogue, and conversation. It’s where diverse groups of people can pursue curiosity.

Be the top-of-mind resource for all of your patrons’ discovery needs and empower learning and discovery.

Better support your patron’s curiosity about LGBTQ history and activism, nineteenth-century America, and American prose fiction from 1774-1920 with one-time purchase archives.

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Tales for the ‘Every-day Reader’: Winston Churchill and the ‘War in the Indian Highlands’

Posted on December 14, 2015

By: Daniel Pullin, Publishing Assistant, Gale, a part of Cengage Learning

When the name ‘Winston Churchill’ is mentioned, images of a heroic war leader with cigar in mouth and face set in steely determination are usually the first to come to mind. His wartime speeches became iconic in symbolising gung-ho British determination to battle on through endless bloodshed, helping steer Britain through the turmoil of a cataclysmic conflict. Yet, with perhaps less well-known flair, the former Prime Minister proved equally adept on paper.  This is evident in his first published material: a series of war letters commissioned for British newspaper The Daily Telegraph.

Between October and December 1897, Churchill wrote and published the eleven letters while accompanying the Malakand Field Force in India. With Gale’s The Telegraph Historical Archive, 1855-2000 now available, these letters are fully-searchable in digital format for the first time. This gave me the perfect opportunity to explore their contents.

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