In Other News: Race

three hands from different race people clasping hands

A look at a current news item through the lens of different titles available on GVRL to find research inspiration.

By Michelle Eickmeyer

A fair skinned woman with a weave claims to be black. A white kid with twisted views killed nine innocent blacks while attending a Bible study. The president said the n-word. A lot of people are talking about a flag. The last two weeks have been filled with conversations of race and what it means in America.

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In Other News: Charity

close up of charity entry in the dictionary

A look at a current news item through the lens of different titles available on GVRL.

By Michelle Eickmeyer

Saving and improving lives is expensive work. And without donations, most of it would not be possible. This week, the Federal Trade Commission charged four “charities” and their administrators for out-right stealing nearly $200 million. Two charities have already been dissolved. Reprehensible behavior. But if you want to give, how do you know with whom to spend your money? One solution is Charity Watch, an independent organization that can help you understand where and how a donation might be spent. There are a number of other resources and websites; that is just one.

In 2013, Americans gave $335.17 billion to charity. Of that, $240.6 billion was given by individuals (Source).  I’ve been especially interested in final numbers of donations for 2014 for a number of reasons. First, my cousin’s 2-year-old was diagnosed with leukemia. (Did you know that the National Institute of Cancer dedicates only 4% of its funding to pediatric cancer research (Source ) Why did cancer have to touch my family to learn that?) Second, the ice bucket challenge (and Mike Rowe). Here’s my previous post on it! In 2014, the ice bucket challenge raised $220 Million for the ALS Association (Source). That’s about 700% more than the year before (Source). Did more people give in 2014, or did people give more, or did they just give differently? The new numbers, expected next month, will tell.

Who currently gives (or doesn’t), and how much, when, and why are sometimes surprising. Low- and middle-income people give a higher percentage of their income than their high-income counterparts. Residents of large cities are less likely to give. When you compare the level of giving across states and the District, of the 20 most generous, only two voted democrat in the last election (Source). All sorts of assumptions will not be made on why that is the way it is.

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In Other News: McDreamy

A look at a current news item through the lens of different titles available on GVRL.

By Michelle Eickmeyer

Some things are sacred. Maybe not any of the characters on Game of Thrones… but for 11 years, Grey’s Anatomy heartthrob, Dr. Derek Shepherd. The social media response Thursday night was, well, huge. Not to be glib, but you would have thought an actual person died. But when you spend time with someone every week for more than a decade, they can start to feel kind of real. Especially when their nickname is McDreamy, and he’s supposed to be the man of your dreams. I get it. And in case you didn’t get enough of the craziness on Friday, ABC has put together a 2:34 montage of clips sure to get you sad and angry again. I’m sorry.

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In Other News: Sarah Thomas

A look at a current news item through the lens of different titles available on GVRL.

By Michelle Eickmeyer

First, apologies for the break. I was taken down by spring allergies/my annual sinus infection, then having a great time with many of you at ACRL, then recovering from both of those things. But back at it! Last year at this time, I wrote about the Masters. If that had not happened, today’s post would feature a clip of Jack, easily sinking his predicted hole in one. Man, he’s good. Or I could have written about the horrible tornadoes which struck Illinois last night. But I had already done that too. Finding a research topic can be tough, especially when all the obvious choices are taken. (Sound familiar?)

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In Other News: The Skeleton Video

A look at a current news item through the lens of different titles available on GVRL.

By Michelle Eickmeyer

Most of my colleagues know I write this post, and often ask me throughout the week what topics are in the running for the post. There is often one or two stories or events which immediately seem like good options. Once I even did two posts. But the idea that it’s easy to find something which you could explore, on a scholarly level, and find accredited, proper sources for a research paper or project is exactly the point of this blog. I do not write this to remind graduate professors how easy some students have it and how random those first years of honing a research skill can be. I write this post to encourage those who support the often rudderless-ships of undergraduate, introductory level, new to a topic or new to research students. Research doesn’t have to be scary, or daunting, or incredibly complicated to be appropriate, credible, and respected. Studies prove that the most difficult parts for inexperienced or beginning researchers are selecting an appropriate topic and finding good sources. Getting started is the hardest part. Hopefully, there have been take-aways in this series which have helped you show students that “research” can be found anywhere.

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In Other News: Hoegh Osaka

A look at a current news item through the lens of different titles available on GVRL.

By Michelle Eickmeyer

I’ve been a ‘newsy’ person for as long as I can remember; the story is very important to me. When I choose the topic for this post, I try to choose something which is compelling, interesting, and perhaps something which you would not typically consider as a great jumping off point for a research project. As often as possible, I try to include something “big” from news outside of the US, as being aware of the world is always important. Looking through my previous posts, there are many tragedies, sporting events and issues caused by the weather. More times than not, it’s obvious what this post should be about. But today I’m going to put a pin in the biggest story happening in the world right now, and save it for next week as events are still, and rapidly, unfolding. Les Parisiens ont été dans mes pensées pendant des jours. Mai cette fin bientôt.

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In Other News: The Grand Jury

A look at a current news item through the lens of different titles available on GVRL.

By Michelle Eickmeyer

Earlier this week, I read this article about growing concern with the silent dwindling of the wild giraffe population around the world. I really wanted to write about giraffes. But I can’t. Instead, this week we’ll focus on the concept of the grand jury and what, for many, seems like a system which makes no sense and is mightily broken.

Two grand juries returned verdicts this week in cases involving a white police officer and the death of a black man. From lack of proof to belief that ample proof was ignored, protests and press conferences, the strength of the American legal system was the lead story every day this week. For better, or worse.

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In Other News: Rosetta Comet Landing

A look at a current news item through the lens of different titles available on GVRL.

By Michelle Eickmeyer

The European Space Agency (ESA) has landed something on a comet. This, frankly, is astounding. The Rosetta mission began 2 March 2004, involved dipping into gravitation fields three times for a boost (Earth’s twice, and Mar’s once. Ever play crack the whip as a kid? Similar principle.); a three year, mid-flight nap; and more than two months of “preparing for landing.” Sure, the Philae Lander had a bit of a bump when it landed. That it happened at all — well, that’s just something. ESA has a fantastic animation, with timelines, on the decade-long voyage.

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In Other News: Women in the News

A look at a current news item through the lens of different titles available on GVRL.

By Michelle Eickmeyer

Some amazing women did some amazing things this week. And sadly, some horrible things were said about and done to some amazing women this week as well.

This post is going to be a slightly different format than usual. Hopefully you’ll find the information just as useful.

Here are five titles that look at women from different perspectives:

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In Other News: Domestic Violence

A look at a current news item through the lens of different titles available on GVRL.

By Michelle Eickmeyer

Isolating. Shaming. Controlling. Blaming. Intimidating. Threatening. Pulling. Pushing. Slapping. Choking. Hitting. Kicking. Raping. Killing. It’s all bad.

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