The Big Jump From High School To College

By Traci Cothran

Diamond is a recent high school graduate from a charter school in Detroit, heading off to college this fall. We’ve been together for four years in the Big Brothers Big Sisters Detroit program, and I recently demonstrated our Gale databases for her, and asked her a few questions to share here on our blog.

You’re a college freshman – congratulations!  What are you excited – and maybe anxious – about?

I’m excited to get away from home and be independent.  I’m nervous about the work load in comparison to high school – everyone says it’s much harder – but I’m confident I have the organizational skills for success.  However, my college has great tutoring resources that I know I can use – and they’re located right in my dorm.  I’m not planning on working or doing sports my first year to be sure I have a handle on academics.  But I am going to check out the various clubs and organizations and plan to join some.

Did you visit a library at your college during the tour? 

Yes, we toured the library.  The library not only had a floor with books, but I was surprised to find it had a study floor, and quiet floors, too.  There’s a tablet instead of a librarian to use to find resources and direct you to them.  I don’t recall online resources mentioned during the tour.

How much did you use print books and electronic resources during high school?

Once I switched schools after ninth grade, it was 100% digital and worksheets – no print textbooks.  We were a “Google school,” and we were provided with Google computers, with Google software and integration.  I’m comfortable with either digital or print, though sometimes I prefer print.  My teachers used all kinds of online resources, but we did not have a physical library or librarian.

Read more…

Lasell Library Uses GVRL to Enhance Student Research

Jill Shoemaker, a librarian at Lasell College in Newton, Massachusetts, where over 1,700 students have come to expect quick search results cShoemakeromparative to Google, but with relevancy and accuracy. Lasell Library uses Gale eBooks on GVRL as a “one-stop shop” to provide students “exactly what they’re looking for.” What they are looking for is easy to use access to digital research materials that meet academic standards. “I would definitely recommend GVRL,” says Shoemaker, “the books are excellent, the professors really like it, and it’s wonderful for the students—who love it!”

Challenge

  •  Information literacy librarian struggles to ensure honors students have access to and use digital research materials that meet academic standards.
  • Convince students who constantly compare digital learning tools to Google and the open web to use trusted reference sources.

Solution 

Read more…

Data-Driven Decision Making Ideally Locates New Library Construction

Posted on May 9, 2016

When Dedham Public Library realized the time had come to replace both its 19th century main library and early 20th century branch, the primary question was, where is the best place to construct a new library to meet the needs of our 21st century patrons?

A professional librarian with more than four decades of experience in public and academic libraries was called upon to help answer the question. Mary Ann Tricarico, BA, MLS, MA, DA, began researching, tabulating and analyzing information to create a strategic planning document to optimally locate the new construction. “All my career I’ve been involved in answering complex questions about communities, patron populations, borrowing patterns and usage data – all hand- calculated and hand-tabulated,” she says, noting that it’s an expensive and time- consuming activity.

Read more…

How to Get and Hold Student’s Attention

Posted on December 18, 2015

By Megan McCarthy

We’ve all heard the saying, “information is power.” That being said, sometimes too much information makes you feel powerless. Take for example, my experience making lasagna. I needed a good recipe for lasagna one night. So, I googled “great lasagna recipes.” I got 247 great lasagna recipe posts. Completely overwhelmed by the amount of information, I quickly closed my computer and ordered pizza. The lasagna would have to wait for another night.

The same is true in the classroom. Students and teachers can be completely overwhelmed by the amount of information available today. Finding the right balance for success can be tricky. If teachers overload their students, they are likely to shut down. If they pick the wrong subject matter or use the wrong content, students can lose interest. That’s why CLiC (Classroom in Context) is such a valuable tool in the classroom.

Read more…

'