Gale Grows Digital Archive Program to Better Address Research Needs and Further Support Digital Humanities

Published on March 29, 2016

Digital archives available under new Gale Primary Sources brand!

Gale, a leading provider of library resources and part of Cengage Learning, announced the expansion and rebranding of its digital archive program. The new Gale Primary Sources program will increase both product volume and multicultural content to support new disciplines and research needs in the areas of digital humanities and text and data mining.

 

“Our multicultural digital archive program is really unprecedented in scale and scope – from the amount of resources we’re developing to the signing of new content partners from different parts of the world, as well as the diversity of the rare and unique content we’re digitizing,” said Paul Gazzolo, senior vice president and general manager for Gale. “This material – much of which has never been made available for research use – coupled with our technology and unique digital tools is helping scholars map the story of humankind.”

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Celebrate with Gale: 800 Years of the Magna Carta

By Bethany Dotson

The Magna Carta, proclaimed at Runnymede on 15 June 1215, is 800 years old this week.  The Magna Carta, or Great Charter of Liberty, is the document that King John signed, accepting restraints on the monarchy. It remains a cornerstone of modern English and American law. During the American Revolution, “the English used the Magna Carta to support their claim of parliamentary sovereignty, whereas Americans distilled from it the principle of ‘no taxation without representation.’”[1]

It’s no surprise, then, that using Term Frequency tool in Gale Artemis: Primary Sources, searching through the 26 collections currently cross-searchable in this experience (including Eighteenth Century Collections Online, the Making of Modern Law collections, Nineteenth Century Collections Online, and more), I was able to isolate a surge in the popularity of the term “Magna Carta” in documents published between approximately 1749 and 1796. The high point? Fifteen out of the 16,490 documents in Artemis: Primary Sources published in 1767 contain this term.

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Gale Artemis: Literary Sources gives you more with cross-searching

Artemis Literary Sources

Did you hear the news? Gale Artemis: Literary Sources is taking another step towards helping you get the literary information you need when you need it with the additions of Something About the Author and Dictionary of Literary Biography! If you have these series, you’ll now be able to cross-search with other incredible literary sources like Twayne’s Authors Online, Scribner Writers Online, Literature Criticism Online, and more.

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