The Great American Eclipse 2017

On August 21, 2017, North America will see its first total solar eclipse in a century. A solar eclipse happens when the moon passes between the sun and Earth. Even though the sun is much bigger than the moon, because the moon is so much closer to us, they appear about the same size in the sky. If the moon is full and lined up perfectly, the result is a total solar eclipse.

In August, this perfect alignment—the total eclipse—will occur along a 70-mile-wide (113-km wide) line that cuts through 12 states, from Oregon and Idaho through Missouri and Illinois, and ending in South Carolina. Observers in this area will see the moon approach the sun, cover it completely so that only a bright ring appears around the moon, and then pass over. The whole process takes two or three hours. The moon will totally obscure the sun for about 2 minutes, during which time the sky becomes dark as night.

Even if you don’t live in an area where you can see the total eclipse, you can still experience this unique event. Almost all of the continental U.S. will see at least 70% coverage of the sun in a partial solar eclipse. But be careful! You need to wear special eclipse glasses and have solar filters on your cameras to view the event. Looking directly at the eclipse can result in permanent damage to your eyes, even if you’re looking through a telescope.

The Great American Eclipse is a once-in-a-lifetime event that’s a great learning experience for people of all ages, and Gale resources are a rich source of eclipse information.

On the Science In Context eclipse page, you can:

Student Resources In Context now features eclipse content including:

Research In Context now features:

General OneFile eclipse content includes:

National Geographic Kids features:

At Gale, we always integrate to keep our resources current with events, such as the eclipse. We empower you to participate in this rare event through engaging activities and up-to-date content. Contact your Sales Rep today!

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