A New Series on Literature and Film Adaptation

| By Elizabeth Ferguson |

In today’s rush to produce more and more content for the silver screen, there is no shortage of cinematic adaptations of literary works. This concept and process is not new, however—directors and screenwriters have long been retelling beloved classics in feature-film format. Take, for example, Francis Ford Coppola’s adaptation of Dracula. Or François Truffaut’s take on Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451 and James Whale’s version of Frankenstein. Even current works, such as the Harry Potter and Hunger Games series, have found immense success in the film world. Books to Film: Cinematic Adaptations of Literary Works, a new annual series offered on Gale’s GVRL eBook platform, explores the vast world of film adaptation. Entries discuss basic plot summaries of featured books and films; examine critical reaction to each adaptation at the time of their respective releases; provide biographical information on authors, directors, and screenwriters; and explore the process by which the book is transformed into a film. Adaptations covered range “from the silent period (1895–1927) through to contemporary cinema, from studios major and minor as well as independents, from Hollywood and around the globe” as Editor in Chief Barry Keith Grant writes in his introduction to Volume 1. Literary works covered include fiction and nonfiction, canonical works and bestsellers, classic and contemporary works, and long and short writing.

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Fostering a Global Perspective

| By Mary Ruby |

Global perspective. These words are increasingly uttered by educators and employers who understand that this combination of mindset and acquired skill is a critical element for interacting, working, and succeeding in the 21st-century world.

As a senior content developer at Gale, my goal is to bring people information not only to meet their needs but to spark curiosity and encourage further investigation and learning. In recent years, the challenge has expanded to building international coverage, appealing to a global audience, and aligning content with topics studied at the collegiate level.

This latter ambition is tied to trends in education, from the nearly 40% increase in International Baccalaureate schools over the past five years1 to the growth of global studies degree programs, ranging from associate to doctoral levels. Common links among these curricula are an interdisciplinary approach, a focus on global issues, and the cultivation of cross-cultural awareness. For instance, at the University of California, Berkeley, a learning goal of its Global Studies program is “apply[ing] an interdisciplinary approach to the study of contemporary global issues,” while the College of William & Mary notes that students will explore “the ways in which global forces are realized in and through local contexts, and the interconnections between global regions.”

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