New Content Added to Smithsonian Primary Sources in U.S. History

Newly added to Smithsonian Primary Sources in U.S. History: 236 primary sources (text and images) with curriculum correlations for easy integration into the classroom workflow. Content has been added across the eras, but especially boosts coverage in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Among the 113 new text documents are: Coverage of the Donald … Read more

Why, How, and When to Use National Geographic Ladders

| By Stephanie Harvey, Program Consultant | Teachers have quite a few hurdles to jump, obstacles to dodge, and ladders to scale these days. It seems as if there is an ever-increasing influx of new initiatives, programs, and standards every year. While all this activity can be exciting, it can also be overwhelming. At times … Read more

Gale Researches: Stubby—the Four-Legged War Hero

| By Traci Cothran | There’s been something of a love fest going on between Sgt. Stubby and the Gale K12 Content Team these last few months, ever since we heard word about the “Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero” movie being released this week. It’s easy to understand why, of course: Stubby is an adorable … Read more

Gale Researches: A Wrinkle in Time

| By Debra Kirby | I am counting the days until the March release of A Wrinkle in Time, the movie based on Madeleine L’Engle’s award-winning novel. In anticipation of the movie, I decided to spend a little time revisiting the story by checking to see what Gale resources could provide. Like all forays into Gale … Read more

Creating Purposeful Content for the Classroom

| By Jessica Bomarito| I have just returned from San Francisco, where I attended NCSS—the annual conference for the National Council for the Social Studies. I arrived in San Francisco on a cold, rainy Thursday— an evening in the midst of a protest designed to raise awareness to the housing needs of the city’s homeless … Read more

A Collection That Supports Black History Year-Round

| By Nicole Albrecht | When I started my third year of teaching I was in inner-city Detroit, Michigan. The students were predominantly African American from various parts of the city and their own experiences made teaching challenging and exciting at the same time. When I introduced them to their lesson during Black History Month, … Read more

A New Series on Literature and Film Adaptation

| By Elizabeth Ferguson |

In today’s rush to produce more and more content for the silver screen, there is no shortage of cinematic adaptations of literary works. This concept and process is not new, however—directors and screenwriters have long been retelling beloved classics in feature-film format. Take, for example, Francis Ford Coppola’s adaptation of Dracula. Or François Truffaut’s take on Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451 and James Whale’s version of Frankenstein. Even current works, such as the Harry Potter and Hunger Games series, have found immense success in the film world. Books to Film: Cinematic Adaptations of Literary Works, a new annual series offered on Gale’s GVRL eBook platform, explores the vast world of film adaptation. Entries discuss basic plot summaries of featured books and films; examine critical reaction to each adaptation at the time of their respective releases; provide biographical information on authors, directors, and screenwriters; and explore the process by which the book is transformed into a film. Adaptations covered range “from the silent period (1895–1927) through to contemporary cinema, from studios major and minor as well as independents, from Hollywood and around the globe” as Editor in Chief Barry Keith Grant writes in his introduction to Volume 1. Literary works covered include fiction and nonfiction, canonical works and bestsellers, classic and contemporary works, and long and short writing.

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