Spreading the Word about a New, Serious Hepatitis in Children

| By Brenda W. Lerner, RN, ALB | The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is spreading the word for pediatricians to look for signs in their young patients of an unusual disease that attacks the liver, causing a serious hepatitis-like syndrome. So far (as of late April 2022), the disease has killed one … Read more

Gale Literature Resource Center Additions Boost DEI Coverage

| By Gale Staff | Gale is excited to announce the inclusion of more than 2,000 additional entries in the Gale Literature Resource Center, drawn from 10 titles that were selected based on their unique perspectives that include both American and international experiences, often with an emphasis on first-person narratives. Most of these titles make … Read more

New Titles for Gale OneFile, May 2022

| By Gale Staff | Gale Academic OneFile Aesthetic Surgery Journal Open Forum (Oxford University Press) Peer-Reviewed Antibody Therapeutics (Oxford University Press) Peer-Reviewed FEMS Microbes (Oxford University Press) Peer-Reviewed International Journal of Accounting, Economics, and Finance Perspectives (International Academy of Business and Public Administration Disciplines) Peer-Reviewed microLife (Oxford University Press) Peer-Reviewed Gale OneFile: Health and … Read more

Honoring Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders

| By Carol Brennan | The month of May is designated Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) Heritage Month to illuminate the contributions of millions of Americans whose family origins are in Pacific Rim nations or the Asian subcontinent. Layered throughout Gale In Context: Biography are hundreds of incisive essays that honor the most courageous … Read more

Black Voices. Black Stories.

| By Tiffany Duck | As a peer reviewer for the Black Voices Standing Order Plan, I am excited about reviewing and selecting titles from diverse voices. It’s important to have representation from authors who identify as Black or African American but hail from countries all over the world. I’m also a member of the … Read more

The Legacy of Poet Emily Dickinson

| By Sarah Robertson | When American poet Emily Dickinson died in relative obscurity on May 15, 1886, her groundbreaking body of work stood unpublished and unrecognized. Today, Dickinson is regarded as a pivotal figure in American poetry, and her works are celebrated for their departure from literary conventions and their challenge of societal norms. … Read more

Earth Day: From 1971 to Today

|By Amy Hackney Blackwell| This Earth Day, it’s worth thinking about some of the things the environmental movement has accomplished over the past 52 years. Earth Day was born out of frustration. In the 1960s, the United States had no legislation preventing industry from discharging pollutants into the air or water, with predictable results. In … Read more

Breaking Major League Baseball’s Color Barrier

The 75th Anniversary of Jackie Robinson | By Shirelle Phelps| On April 15, 1947, Jackie Robinson broke baseball’s long-standing color barrier when he debuted for the Brooklyn Dodgers. Since 2004, Major League Baseball (MLB) has celebrated this historic date annually. One way the MLB honors Robinson is by having all Major League players and on-field … Read more

National Poetry Month: Poets through the Years

| By Carol Brennan | Poetry is nearly the oldest form of creative expression in the history of humankind, possibly second to the cave paintings of Lascaux, France, as evidence that our brains strive to explain and invent lyrical stories about the world around us. For National Poetry Month 2022, we’d like to recommend some … Read more