Jason Reynolds, National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature

| By Traci Cothran | I don’t know about you, but January is usually a tough month—the holidays are over, friends and family have dispersed, you’re five pounds heavier than before the holidays, and the weather is usually pretty crummy. But there are two things that get me through this month: the American Library Association … Read more

For Students: Highlighting African American Literature

| By Michelle Lee & Kristen Dorsch | African American Literature for Students, Volume 1—the first in Gale’s new line of For Students special editions—is now available! It includes 14 entries on novels, poems, short stories, and dramas that have never before been covered in For Students. Entries include works from tried-and-true authors such as … Read more

Vampires, Skeletons, and Monsters

| By Gale Staff | As Halloween approaches, readers with an interest in the eerie and macabre side of literary history can find plenty to keep them up at night in Literature Criticism Series. Volume 200 of Short Story Criticism, for example, is a triple-feature of horror, with entries on Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu’s novella … Read more

The World’s Most Compelling Responses in Literature

When it comes to literature criticism, Gale continues to be the go-to publisher for researchers. Literature Criticism Online, raises the level of research by offering thoughtful and diverse responses to art, historic events, and literature from around the world. This award-winning series supports the discussion of how the world evolved, cultures have transformed. Offer researchers … Read more

Webinar: The Evolution of the Study of Literature

As the needs of students and employers change with new technologies and market-driven demands, how and what we teach can help build critical skills that reach beyond the hard sciences. In this one-hour webinar, we’ll discuss the underpinnings of literary studies and their importance in a well-rounded academic experience, regardless of the career goals of … Read more

George Washington’s Bookshelf and the Founding of the Novel

| By Eric Bargeron, Layman Poupard Publishing | President’s Day was established in 1968 to celebrate the birthday of George Washington, America’s first chief executive, hailed for his military leadership and his abilities as a statesman. He was a man of action, but John Adams, a bit of a snob, thought Washington was “too illiterate, unlearned, … Read more

A New Series on Literature and Film Adaptation

| By Elizabeth Ferguson |

In today’s rush to produce more and more content for the silver screen, there is no shortage of cinematic adaptations of literary works. This concept and process is not new, however—directors and screenwriters have long been retelling beloved classics in feature-film format. Take, for example, Francis Ford Coppola’s adaptation of Dracula. Or François Truffaut’s take on Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451 and James Whale’s version of Frankenstein. Even current works, such as the Harry Potter and Hunger Games series, have found immense success in the film world. Books to Film: Cinematic Adaptations of Literary Works, a new annual series offered on Gale’s GVRL eBook platform, explores the vast world of film adaptation. Entries discuss basic plot summaries of featured books and films; examine critical reaction to each adaptation at the time of their respective releases; provide biographical information on authors, directors, and screenwriters; and explore the process by which the book is transformed into a film. Adaptations covered range “from the silent period (1895–1927) through to contemporary cinema, from studios major and minor as well as independents, from Hollywood and around the globe” as Editor in Chief Barry Keith Grant writes in his introduction to Volume 1. Literary works covered include fiction and nonfiction, canonical works and bestsellers, classic and contemporary works, and long and short writing.

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The Power of Perusal

| By Catherine DiMercurio | While reviewing entries for Contemporary Authors, Vol. 403, I stumbled across the name of a poet, francine j. harris. Note: she renders her name this way; it isn’t a typo. The poet’s rejection of uppercase letters is not what snagged my attention, though. Words from her biographical sketch leaped out at … Read more

Keeping the Conversation Going

Malala Yousafzai, Svetlana Alexievich and Shakespeare

I think of literary criticism as a conversation: an author speaks to an audience, which responds with comments, questions, sometimes praise, and sometimes disparagement. The discussion can last for centuries. In the case of Shakespeare, for instance, in 1592, early in his career, he was dismissed by fellow writer Robert Greene as an “upstart crow beautified with our feathers” and mocked as a “Shake-scene” (whatever that is).

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Fun, New Ways to Celebrate Book Lover’s Day

By Tara Blair

Readers rejoice—Book Lovers Day (August 9th) is here, encouraging you to kick back and relax with a great book. From shaded spots under arching trees to being tucked in a warm bed, there is no better way to celebrate the holiday than reading. To keep you from growing tired of the norm, we thought of a few ‘out-of-the-box’ ways to honor the occasion.

Read some new ways to observe the classic holiday! 

Find a Literary Haunt Near You
Did you know F. Scott Fitzgerald frequented Oak Bar in New York City’s Plaza Hotel? Or that Victor Hugo found inspiration to write Les Miserables while strolling Paris’ Luxembourg Gardens? No matter where in the world you reside, you can find a great place to get closer to your favorite author while reading.

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