Textual Reuse in the Eighteenth Century

Published on June 9, 2016 By Douglas Ernest Duhaime Digital Humanities Quarterly, 2016, Volume 10 Number 1 University of Notre Dame Being a writer today means creating original content and properly citing sources for borrowed content. But before the middle of the 18th century, authors often committed what most today would consider plagiarism – and … Read more

The Genesis of Digital Humanities and What’s Next.

Published on 5/24/2016 By Gregory Mone Communications of the ACM, Vol. 59 No. 6, Pages 20-21 What’s Next for Digital Humanities? See the story of Father Roberto Busa, an Italian Jesuit priest who conceived the project to index the works of St. Thomas Aquinas word by word. There were an estimated 10 million words, so … Read more

Worldmark Global Health and Medicine Issues:

a “Comprehensive” and “Informative” Resource

Posted on May 20, 2016

Searching for “very useful” information on global health and medicine issues in the modern world?  Worldmark Global Health and Medicine Issues, 1st Edition addresses health and medicine topics relevant to everyone’s lives across the globe. Organized alphabetically, the encyclopedia gives readers easy access to authoritative information on various topics.

This article was published in Booklist‘s May 15, 2016 issue; by Barbara Bibel. Read what she had to say!

CONTENT With the speed of modern travel and the global connections of commerce and industry, health issues quickly become international. This new encyclopedia does an excellent job of placing health and medical problems within social, political, and economic contexts. Using primary source documents, photographs, charts, and graphs to supplement the text, the book provides a brief but comprehensive overview of 90
topics affecting world health.

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Digital Humanities as ‘Corporatist Restructuring’

May 11, 2016 See this very interesting and controversial article by Carl Straumsheim that argues digital humanities scholars are — intentionally or not — leading a “neoliberal takeover” of colleges and universities. This article was published May 6, 2016. Many humanities scholars have praised the digital humanities as one of the more promising developments for their disciplines. … Read more

In the digital age, the humanities can afford to go on the offensive

Posted on May 4, 2016 Author: Vincent F. Hendricks Professor of Formal Philosophy at University of Copenhagen Vincent F. Hendricks writes in The Conversation on the “pervasive narrative about the decline of the humanities”. Vincent speaks about those who believe in the value of the humanities and what they often lend on to support the … Read more

The Digital in the Humanities: A Special Interview Series

Published on April 26, 2016

LARBA piece by LARB Magazine. Check out Melissa Dinsman’s interview with Laura Mandell, full professor of English and the director of the Initiative for Digital Humanities, Media, and Culture at Texas A&M,

 

 

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A Treasure Trove of Queer History Is Now Online

Gale’s Archive of Human Sexuality and Identity being called “A Treasure Trove of Queer History” by Advocate Magazine Published on April 14,2016 Gale’s Archive of Human Sexuality and Identity was recently featured in Advocate Magazine, a leading U.S.-based national gay and lesbian news magazine. In the publication, the collection is noted for its depth of information covering … Read more

Vast digitizing project will put Harvard’s colonial archives online

Published on April 6, 2016 Harvard University has launched a project to digitize almost half a million items from its 17th and 18th century archives – the largest digitizing effort the university has ever undertaken. The letters, journals, documents and drawings tell the story not only of the nation’s oldest institution of higher learning, but … Read more

Gale Grows Digital Archive Program to Better Address Research Needs and Further Support Digital Humanities

Published on March 29, 2016

Digital archives available under new Gale Primary Sources brand!

Gale, a leading provider of library resources and part of Cengage Learning, announced the expansion and rebranding of its digital archive program. The new Gale Primary Sources program will increase both product volume and multicultural content to support new disciplines and research needs in the areas of digital humanities and text and data mining.

 

“Our multicultural digital archive program is really unprecedented in scale and scope – from the amount of resources we’re developing to the signing of new content partners from different parts of the world, as well as the diversity of the rare and unique content we’re digitizing,” said Paul Gazzolo, senior vice president and general manager for Gale. “This material – much of which has never been made available for research use – coupled with our technology and unique digital tools is helping scholars map the story of humankind.”

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