American Reference Books Annual Recommends Infectious Diseases: In Context, Second Edition

American Reference Books Annual Recommends Infectious Diseases: In Context, Second Edition

1 min read

| By Gale Staff |

American Reference Books Annual (ARBA) just published its review on Infectious Diseases: In Context, 2nd Edition. The newest edition, available in print and eBook format on our platform, GVRL, is a comprehensive guide to the important topic of emerging and infectious diseases; covering the history, politics, and ethical debates related to infectious diseases.

Read below for learn why this title is “highly recommended” by Kevin McDonough, ARBA Staff Reviewer.

Content

“The second edition has more than 260 entries and includes new entries on anellovirus, anti-cytokine antibody syndromes, enterovirus 71 infection, macrophage Activation Syndrome, microsporidiosis, Powassan virus, President Obama’s initiative on combating antibiotic resistance, protozoan diseases, sepsis as a WHO priority, severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome, talaromycosis, tick-borne diseases, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, and Zika virus.”

Organization

“Entries are arranged alphabetically, and most are about 3-5 pages in length. Each entry is broken into sections: introduction; a Words to Know sidebar; disease history, characteristics, and transmission; scope and distribution; treatment and prevention; impacts and issues; and a short bibliography of books, periodicals, and websites for further study. Colored maps and pictures are scattered throughout the two volumes, but the emphasis is on well-organized and displayed text.”

Additional Features

“Other nice features include a 15-page glossary, which provides entries on the Words to Know sidebars, and a chronology of many of the most significant events in the history of infectious diseases. As this source is meant for students, there is a good introductory section on how to cite entries in different styles and an explanation on how to use primary sources. Highly recommended for high school and public libraries.”

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