Cloning Pets: Good, Bad, or Scary?

Cloning Pets: Good, Bad, or Scary?

1 min read

| By Gale Staff |

Earlier this year the story surfaced that singing legend Barbra Streisand had cloned her beloved dog, Samantha, who had died at the age of 14. As the result of cloning Streisand’s Coton de Tulear, three puppies were created, two of which Streisand kept.  Ethical issues arose surrounding the question of whether pets should be cloned when there are so many dogs and cats in need of homes. Why spend $50,000 to create a clone of your dog who may be a genetic copy, but very well may have a totally different temperament and personality?

Our new eBook Genetics, Second Edition explores the science and controversy of cloning, as well as a host of other cutting-edge, fascinating, and controversial topics.  Genetic research and discovery has exploded, and there’s no better way to keep up than with this authoritative resource that covers all the hot and news-worthy topics, including “genetically modified foods” and the gene-editing tool “CRISPR.”  Videos and images are included, which help with comprehension and understanding.

CRISPR

In this eBook, students can access hands-on experiences, like how to “click and clone” a virtual mouse, to explore biotechnology without the ethical concerns.

@2003 Genetic Science Learning Center, University of Utah

A new feature in Genetics, Second Edition is an Instructional Guide created for educators and students. Tied to the Next Generation Science Standards, the guide is rich with activities, guided reading questions, and additional resources.

Genetics, Second Edition is available in print and eBook format on our GVRL platform, learn more >>

 

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