Kids InfoBits Meets the Needs of Young Students

Kids InfoBits is the perfect educational product for today’s young learners. It is a content-rich, authoritative, easy-to-use digital resource featuring age-appropriate, reliable, curriculum-related content covering a broad range of educational topics. The modern design and simple navigation make it easy for users to explore content and gain comfort with database searching. The content found in … Read more

Global Issues In Context is Recommended for High School Students

Global Issues In Context supports global awareness and provides a global perspective while tying together a wealth of authoritative content, empowering learners to critically analyze and understand the most important issues of the modern world. Integrating news, global viewpoints, reference materials, country information, primary source documents, videos, statistics, and more in a single search—Global Issues … Read more

Unearth the Evacuation of Dunkirk with GVRL

| By Debra Kirby |

What does the release of the movie Dunkirk this weekend have to do with seeing my oldest daughter off to college? See below for the answer.

In the meantime, why not check out a few Gale eBooks on GVRL to bone up on this history changing event?

This brief overview is a good start:

Click to access the entire overview

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Product Update: Gale eBooks on GVRL

Early August, users of Gale eBooks on GVRL can benefit from several platform and search improvements. Our product team is always considering ways to improve the user’s experience, and after reviewing feedback from customers, we’ve made updates to Gale eBooks on GVRL that will greatly benefit users of all types. Take a look at some … Read more

Smithsonian Primary Sources in U.S. History Provides Added Value for Users with New Curriculum Alignments

Smithsonian Primary Sources in U.S. History provides primary sources that cover 15 different eras—perfect for U.S. History and AP U.S. History classes. Inside, students will find over 1,800 seminal primary sources including objects, journal entries, and personal correspondence from the museums, archives, and collections of the Smithsonian, as well as from Gale’s leading digital collections. Gale listens to … Read more

Just Added to GVRL: ISTE Professional Development Collection

ISTE delivers professional development resources for school leaders and teachers, focusing on the most up-to-date technology strategies, equipment, research, and best practices for integration in the classroom. Discover 12 titles—in one comprehensive collection—recently added to GVRL. Media Literacy in the K-12 Classroom The Future-Ready Challenge: Improve Student Outcomes in 18 Weeks The Technology Coordinator’s Handbook … Read more

Constitution Day: Not Just for History Teachers Anymore

| By Nicole Albrecht | Any social studies or history teacher knows what the month of September brings: many national holidays that fall during the school year and are required by their administration to cover in their lessons. One of the most popular of these national holidays is Constitution Day, which is September 17th and … Read more

Amelia Earhart – Mystery Solved?

| By Mark Mikula |

History is a dynamic field of study. New discoveries and ongoing research often provide opportunities to learn new facts about the people and events that have shaped our world. One of American history’s long-standing mysteries regards the fate of the storied aviator Amelia Earhart, whose plane went missing in 1937 during her attempt to circumnavigate the world with navigator Fred Noonan. Various theories regarding her disappearance have been put forward, but a few years ago, a photograph was discovered in the National Archives that is being analyzed to determine whether its subjects include both Earhart and Noonan on one of the Marshall Islands. If their likenesses can be confirmed, it will add credence to speculation that Earhart and Noonan survived after their plane went down.

The photo was found by an enthusiastic former government employee who was investigating the aviator’s disappearance. Its discovery demonstrates that careful examination of physical evidence can result in a more complete picture of the world we inhabit regardless of one’s level of experience.

Read more about current efforts to solve the mystery >>

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Exploring Central Park by Foot and by Mouse

| By Debra Kirby |

After spending five days in New York City, much of it in and around Central Park, I decided to give my tired feet a rest and engage in some online exploration in honor of National Parks and Recreation Month, which has been celebrated in the United States during the month of July since 1985.

I already knew that Central Park was designed by landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted, who also designed Detroit’s Belle Isle Park—where I spent many childhood weekends, picnicking with my family and wading through the mucky sand of the beaches of the Detroit River. But there was so much more to discover, so I jumped into U.S. History In Context and learned:

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