Research In Context Meets the Needs of Middle Grade Students

“Teaching middle school is an adventure not a job,” says author and educator, Angela K. Bennett. There’s no doubt grades 6 to 8 are among the most important for young teens and pre-teens to develop learning skills to launch them into high school and beyond. And until now, resources to support an integrated learning adventure have been few and far between, making teaching and supporting learning for this curious group a challenge. But the tide is turning with a new highly-visual resource featuring authoritative content that’s been designed specifically for middle school learners.

Gale’s Research In Context is a new resource that bridges the gap between Gale’s Kids InfoBits resource for elementary school students and the subject-specific Gale In Context family, developed primarily for high school and undergraduate students. The Gale In Context suite, now including Research In Context, brings together the best and most relevant content on a modern, student-friendly, and mobile-responsive interface.

Covering the most-studied topics in literature, science, social studies, and U.S. and world history, Research In Context features:

  • Engaging reference, periodical, and multimedia content
  • Authoritative information from sources like Gale, National Geographic and Scholastic
  • Alignment to national and state curriculum standards
  • Topic pages and overviews written explicitly for middle schoolers

Thumbs up from 9 out of 10 student users

Having a rich resource in your library is great, but it only has value if students actually use it. So we brought together a group of middle school students to test Gale’s Research In Context and gauge their interest in using it. We were thrilled with their response; nine out of 10 students said using Research In Context would help them get better grades.

Here’s what they like best:

“I like the layout, it’s not confusing. It’s good, more organized, and I like the quick facts.” – Hannah, Age 13

“Some sites don’t have reliable information, or information so hard to understand that I can’t get anything done, but this seems really easy and reliable.” – Calle, Age 12

“It had a lot of facts and it was really easy to understand. Other websites have big words but this one is easy for kids to read.” – Meg, Age 11


Bring them the research support they need most…starting today

The students have spoken! Learn more about Gale’s Research In Context and request a trial >>


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