Do Computers Understand Our Emotions?

| By Misam Abbas | No. But computers can make guesses about our emotions, or sentiments, based on what we write and say. Sentiment analysis is the categorization of pieces of text as having varying degrees of  positive or negative sentiment using computational methods. For example, humans can easily see the sentiment of each of … Read more

Libraries and the Business Community: A Success Story

| Originally published by EveryLibrary | Libraries exist to help people succeed, and the business world is no exception. Many aspiring business owners got their start in a public library, whether through researching how to write a business plan, attending a class on Quickbooks, or developing a marketing list using the library’s electronic resources. The following … Read more

American Civil Liberties Union Papers “is Like Opening a Time Capsule”

Students and researchers can immerse themselves in civil rights history like never before with our new archive American Civil Liberties Union Papers, 1912-1990, part of the Making of Modern Law collection. Drawing from the records of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), it focuses on civil rights, race, gender, and issues relating to the U.S. … Read more

Gale Celebrates National Poetry Month

| By Alja Kooistra | Spring is here! And with it come National Poetry Month and the daffodils:  I wandered lonely as a cloud That floats on high o’er vales and hills, When all at once I saw a crowd, A host, of golden daffodils  —William Wordsworth (1804)  Why spend an entire month to celebrate poetry? In a few … Read more

Subject Searching

| By Heather Hedden | Back in the 1990s, the full browsable subject thesaurus used in InfoTrac was the default end-user display for initiating a search of periodical articles. Over the years the browsable thesaurus became a non-default option and the disappeared, leaving only the possibility of searching among Subjects within a search box.  While I … Read more

Webinar: The Evolution of the Study of Literature

As the needs of students and employers change with new technologies and market-driven demands, how and what we teach can help build critical skills that reach beyond the hard sciences. In this one-hour webinar, we’ll discuss the underpinnings of literary studies and their importance in a well-rounded academic experience, regardless of the career goals of … Read more

Judging Detroit’s National History Day Competition

| By Traci Cothran | The National History Day competition is right up our alley here at Gale—it encourages students to use factual resources (especially primary resources) to create a documentary, performance, paper, website, or exhibit on a historical topic that fits with the overall competition theme. This year’s theme is Conflict and Compromise. I’ve … Read more

Gale’s Women’s Studies Archive Earns a Perfect Content Score

As the first in the Women’s Studies archive, Women’s Issues and Identities traces the path of women’s issues from past to present—pulling primary sources from manuscripts, newspapers, periodicals, and more. It captures the foundation of women’s movements, struggles, and triumphs and provides researchers with valuable insights. Recently, CCAdvisor published a review of this revolutionary collection, giving … Read more

Remembering Stephen Hawking with Gale’s In Context Team

| By Deb Kirby | The news of astrophysicist Stephen Hawking’s death was met with sadness by our Gale In Context team. It was also a call to action to ensure our topic pages for Hawking were updated quickly. I already knew we had a dedicated team, but an email sent at 1:30 am to … Read more