Special Space

By Ronald W. 

My very first trip to a public library was in my hometown of East Haven CT, the “Hagaman Memorial Library”. It was on a field trip in grade school, I was no older than 7. I still remember the experience, starting with the entrance to the building at the time; the steps leading up to the huge doors and once inside the marble floors, the huge staircase, oak furniture and the portraits on the walls. I knew I was inside a special space.
The class attended “story hour” that day in the Children’s section; we were told that “story hour” would occur every Wednesday after school for those who wished to sign up to attend. The whole class received library cards that day.

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Growing Up in a Library…

By Jill Q. 

My hometown was a small one, about 2000 people. Our town library was hence a small one, but it was always where kids went after school to do homework, get a book, or just hang around, maybe get some candy at the village store on the way.

I was no exception to this when I was younger. Our library was a short walk from our elementary and middle school, back when walking was no big deal. My parents both worked and since we got out earlier than my mom’s job was done, I walked to the library every day after school to wait for her to pick me up. It became a big part of my day…I would read, get as much HW done as possible, or have my after-school snack there. I even tried reading the newspapers there when I finished all my other work (granted, I was 8 or 9 at the time, so it would get boring. Other days, I would just explore. I found out I loved reading mysteries because I would just walk through the shelves and found books based on spines that looked interesting. I must have picked up dozens of books that way growing up.

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Why Libraries Matter

By Frank Menchaca

Libraries, it seems, are under attack everywhere. Schools are eliminating librarians. College libraries receive less than three cents of every dollar spent on higher education. Marketing guru Seth Godin— and a chorus of others—has questioned the relevance of libraries in particularly stinging terms.

But there’s good news too. Ninety-five percent of Americans believe that public libraries play an important role in helping people live more successful lives. Students who visit their college libraries even once a semester are much more likely to return to school the following semester than those who do not. According to the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project, “the vast majority of readers aged 16-29 have read a print book in the last year.” And 60 percent of Americans under the age of 30 have used a library within the last 12 months.

The message is clear. Libraries—whether academic, municipal, or special purpose—are essential to the health, wealth, and education of the communities they serve. There’s no doubt libraries are challenged by funding cuts and bad press or that they need to beef up their marketing efforts, but the rumors of their death have been greatly exaggerated.

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Make an Economic Impact on Your Community: The Ripple Effect of a High School Diploma

Impact of High School Diploma

By Diane Sweetwood

Ana Lopez, 27, currently earns just above the federal minimum wage as a cashier at a local supermarket, making $16,410 per year at $7.89 per hour. She aspires to earn a Child Development Associate certification following her successful graduation from Career Online High School. As an infant/toddler teacher at a local child care center, Ana could see an immediate 50% increase of her annual salary to $24,627 per year, at $11.84 an hour, with potential to earn more than $50,000 if she rises to the Director level.

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